Your Pet and Pool Safety

Summer is on the way, making many of us eager to get in the pool. Your dog might feel the same way. We all assume that dogs are natural swimmers, but just you wait! Before letting your pup take a dip, make sure you know how to keep your fur baby safe in the pool. You can learn how by reading this article.

Give Your Dog Swimming Lessons

Should you give your dog swimming lessons? Don’t assume your dog is naturally a strong swimmer. The fact is, some canines forget to use their back legs while swimming. That’s why it’s important to give your dog swim lessons. Here’s what you need to do:

  • Get in the pool with your pooch
  • Encourage your dog to start swimming
  • While your pup swims, hold up your dog’s back-end. This should prompt your pet to use his or her back legs
  • Eventually, your furry friend will be in the habit of using the back and front legs to swim

Don’t Push Your Pup Too Hard

If your dog is overweight and out of shape, don’t push your pup too hard too soon. Otherwise, your dog may end up with sore and/or injured muscles. Prevent soreness and injuries by starting out with short swim sessions. You can gradually increase the duration of each session. And even if your canine companion is in great shape, you should still keep a close watch on your dog’s energy level. If you notice your pet getting tired, end that day’s swim session.  

Invest in a Life Vest

A life jacket should be considered whenever a dog is in or near water, even if it’s merely a swimming pool. Even if your dog is a great swimmer and has pool experience, they should wear a life vest when visiting strange pools with varied designs.

Here are some of the Best Dog Life Jackets in 2021: https://www.businessinsider.com/best-dog-life-jacket

Other Pool Dangers

Watch for Heat Stroke

Even when your dog is splashing around in a cool pool, he or she may still be susceptible to heatstroke. This is especially true if your pup has a tendency to jump in and out of the water. What are signs of heatstroke in dogs? Signs of heatstroke in dogs include:

  • Excessive Panting
  • Dark Pink Gums
  • Dark Pink tongue

If you suspect your four-legged friend is starting to get overheated, immediately end your dog’s activities. Then take your dog to a shady spot where your pet can rest and get a drink of water. Keep your dog in this spot until your furry pal has fully recovered. If your dog is showing more serious signs, get to the vet ASAP. While on the way there, try to cool your canine down by keeping wet towels on your dog.  

Rinse Your Dog Off

Before drying off and heading inside, give your dog a quick rinse. This will remove the chlorine from your pet’s coat, preventing dry skin and hair.  

Don’t Let Your Dog Drink Pool Water

Can dogs drink pool water? Don’t worry if your dog accidentally swallows a bit of water while swimming. But you should intervene if your furball purposely laps up the water. Allowing your pup to drink too much pool water may cause negative reactions, such as:  

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Esophageal Damage

Plan for Emergencies

Preparing for the worst-case scenario is wise. With that in mind, plan how you will respond if your dog ever needs to be rescued from the pool. Besides figuring out how to get your dog out of the pool, you should also:

  • Determine which emergency vet you will take your dog to
  • Keep the emergency vet’s contact information on hand so that it’s easy to locate during emergencies
  • Learn CPR and other first-aid skills

Never Leave Your Dog Alone

No matter how well your dog swims, never leave your canine alone in the pool. Constant supervision is a must during pool playtime.  

In Conclusion

Swimming with your dog is probably one of the most fun summertime activities you could think of. Just be sure to take all of the proper precautions so that your fur baby stays safe. Other than that, have a great time swimming with your beloved canine!

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